King’s Robotic Drummer Performs at the 2014 Royal Institution Christmas Lectures

December 31, 2014 Leave a comment

A robotic drummer built by the King’s Robotics Society performed as part of a robot orchestra at the 2014 Royal Institution Christmas Lectures.

The robot orchestra at this year’s Christmas Lectures demonstrates that robots come in all shapes and sizes. The Department of Informatics was asked to build a robot drummer that could play music by itself. With the help of the department, the newly founded King’s Robotics Society took this project and built a robotic drum kit, called “The Drum Bot”, that can play drum tracks encoded as MIDI files. The Drum Bot and the robot orchestra can be seen in action in the following video:

The 2014 Christmas Lectures, entitled ‘Sparks will fly: How to hack your home‘ will be broadcast on BBC Four on the evening of December the 29th, 30th and 31st; and will subsequently be available on iPlayer. To see how the Drum Bot was built, visit Robotics Society web page at

Categories: Uncategorized

MSc scholarships for 2014 entry

The Department of Informatics has some fully funded MSc scholarships available for people who are looking to further their career in Computing, Robotics and Telecommunications. They cover both fees and living costs and are available for study on the following MSc programmes (September 2014 entry):


–          Advanced Computing MSc

–          Advanced Software Engineering MSc

–          Computing & Internet Systems MSc

–          Computing & Security MSc

–          Computing, IT Law & Management MSc

–          Electronic Engineering with Business Management MSc

–          Engineering with Management MSc

–          Intelligent Systems MSc

–          Mobile & Personal Communications MSc

–          Robotics MSc

–          Telecommunications & Internet Technology MSc

–          Web Intelligence MSc


King’s College London has been awarded funds through the HEFCE Postgraduate Support Scheme, to broaden access to postgraduate study for academically excellent applicants coming from less privileged backgrounds. This is part of a government initiative to increase access into the professions. The scheme seeks to enhance the knowledge and skills of the scholars with a view to future employment within these sectors.

For details about eligibility and to apply, visit

Application Deadline: 14th July

Categories: Uncategorized Tags: ,

All the world’s a stage

April 10, 2014 Leave a comment

Giving a lecture involves a performance before an audience.  Therefore, we thought it useful to have an expert in public performances – a theatre director – to give us some training in the physical aspects of performance.  These include features such as voice projection, breathing, posture, stance, and movement.   We have just had two very exciting and successful training sessions led by actor and director, Mr Marcus Bazley.    The participants found these sessions great fun.  As well as being useful and effective, they were a welcome change from our usual daily activities.    We even did some exercises used by actors at the Royal Shakespeare Company, although I doubt any of us will be giving up our day jobs.

The Science of Delegation

March 28, 2014 Leave a comment

Most people, if they think about the topic at all, probably imagine computer science involves the programming of computers.  But what are computers?  In most cases, these are just machines of one form or another.  And what is programming?  Well, it is the issuing of instructions (“commands” in the jargon of programming) for the machine to do something or other, or to achieve some state or other.   Thus, we can view Computer Science as nothing more or less than the science of delegation.

When delegating a task to another person, we are likely to be more effective (as the delegator or commander) the more we know about the skills and capabilities and current commitments and attitudes of that person (the delegatee or commandee).   So too with delegating to machines.   Accordingly, a large part of theoretical computer science is concerned with exploring the properties of machines, or rather, the deductive properties of mathematical models of machines.  Other parts of the discipline concern the properties of languages for commanding machines, including their meaning (their semantics) – this is programming language theory.

Because the vast majority of lines of program code nowadays are written by teams of programmers, not individuals, then much of computer science – part of the branch known as software engineering – is concerned with how to best organize and manage and evaluate the work of teams of people.   Because most machines are controlled by humans and act in concert for or with or to humans, then another, related branch of this science of delegation deals with the study of human-machine interactions.   In both these branches, computer science reveals itself to have a side which connects directly with the human and social sciences, something not true of the other sciences often grouped with Computer Science: pure mathematics, physics, or chemistry.  With the rise of networked machines, we may find ourselves delegating tasks not simply to one machine, but to multiple machines, acting in concert or in parallel in some way.   The branch of computer science known as distributed computing thus deals with delegation to, and co-ordination of,  multiple machines.  As a consequence of this, computer scientists think a lot about combinations of actions and concurrency, more than do researchers in any other discipline.   This is exactly as we would expect for a science of delegation.

And from its modern beginnings 70 years ago, computer science has been concerned with trying to automate whatever can be automated – in other words, with delegating the task of delegating.  This is the branch known as Artificial Intelligence.   We have intelligent machines which can command other machines, and manage and control them in the same way that humans could.   But not all bilateral relationships between machines are those of commander-and-subordinate.  More often in distributed networks, machines are peers of one another, intelligent and autonomous (to varying degrees).  Thus, commanding is useless – persuasion is what is needed for one intelligent machine to ensure that another machine does what the first desires, just as with human beings.   And so, as one would expect in a science of delegation, computational argumentation arises as an important area of study.

Copenhagen – one last performance

March 16, 2014 Leave a comment

Two performances of  Copenhagen have now been held, and both were simply superb.  There are reviews here and here.  There is one performance remaining – tonight, Sunday 16 March 2014, at 19.30, at the King’s Building on the Strand.   So hurry along tonight if you want to catch some riveting theatre!

The play is sponsored by the King’s College Londoen School of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, and is financially supported by the King’s Alumni & Supporter Relations Office, through the Student Opportunity Fund, funded by the generosity of Alumni donations.

Categories: Events

hackchallenge 2014

March 10, 2014 Leave a comment


Hackathons are emerging as one of the key ways students develop hands-on skills, develop exciting products, and work with tech companies.  London is at the centre of the 21st century tech revolution, with London hackathons organised by companies such as Facebook; and KCL Tech‘s own internationally attended event, hackkings.

Buoyed by the success of this, first-year informatics student Fares Alaboud wanted to create a hackathon for his classmates.  The premise was simple: take the essence of a hackathon experience (teamwork, hacking code, free pizza, prizes); make sure it’s accessible to first years by giving them some code to help them get started; then stand back and watch the magic happen.  With the assistance of Mark Ormesher, Mustafa Al-Bassam, Alex Iurov and Sanyia Saidova, and the kind support of King’s Student Opportunity Fund, and King’s College London Teaching Fund, thus was born…

hackchallenge 2014

At the crack of noon, the hackathon began – the students, in teams of three, had eight hours to make an automated trading system based on trading shares of kickstarter projects, using a trading platform developed by Piotr Galar as part of Steffen Zschaler’s ‘Challenge2Code’ project.   The system gives a novel slant on classical trading – their system has to use the same sort of intelligent algorithmic techniques to choose when to buy and sell shares, based on the market conditions.  At the end of the day, the students’ systems competed against each other, with a range of prizes up for grabs:

  • For the first-placed team, £30 each of Amazon vouchers
  • For the second-placed team, £15 each of iTunes vouchers
  • For the third-placed team, £10 each of Pizza Hut vouchers

Students were also entered into an hourly random draw to win a one-month premium Spotify subscription.


The day was a great success.  Fares’s own words sum it up well: “It was everything I hoped it would be and more! They enjoyed the event and, most importantly, the atmosphere. They were really excited and active throughout the whole eight hours. They never gave up and always put a lot of effort into coding, knowing they didn’t have to win but at least to accomplish something. They understood that it was all about the learning experience, more than the one of winning. And that’s how they became winners.”

First place – The Exceptions

IMG_9977From left to right: organiser Fares Alaboud; and team members Anuar Aitimov, Ainur Makhmet and Kristin Kasavetova

Second place – Scarpinici

IMG_9973From left to right: team members Codrin Gîdei and George-Cristian Raduta; organiser Mark Ormesher

Third place – Team Rocket

IMG_9970From left to right: team members Amrinder Rai and Jan Jeras; and organiser Alex Iurov.  Not shown: team member Harrison Perry

For more photos from the day, see the hackchallenge 2014 photo set on flickr.  To keep up to date with student tech activities across UK, sign up for

Hack Challenge 2014

March 8, 2014 Leave a comment


As we speak, first-year Informatics students at King’s College today are engaged in a Saturday programming tournament, aiming to successfully predict funding of Kickstarter projects.   This hacking challenge is led by Dr Steffen Zschaler and Dr Andrew Coles, with the platform development being led by Piotr Galar.  The day was organized by Fares Alaboud of the KCL Tech Society, with support from Mustafa Al-Bassam, Iurov Alex, Mark Ormesher and Sanyia Saidova.   Photos here.

Thanks to the King’s College Teaching Fund for supporting the development of the tournament platform, and to the King’s Experience Fund and the School of Natural and Mathematical Sciences for supporting the prizes and the pizzas!

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