Twitch Plays Pokemon

March 2, 2014 Leave a comment

Recently, the streaming service Twitch TV offered Pokemon as a massively multi-player game.   Anyone with Internet access may – at least for a moment – control the game, and thousands have tried.   As always in life, not everyone has the same goals, so allowing thousands to sit in the driver’s seat means that the results are not straightforward – they tend to oscillate between chaos and stasis.   xkcd summarized the situation eptly (click on the image to embiggen it):

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That so many would seek to play when no individual can achieve very much is not a new discovery in human psychology.   NYNEX, the main local phone company in New York and New England (now part of Verizon),  ran a technical trial of interactive telecommunications back in the 1990s, renting 15 minutes each week on a local Manhattan cable channel in the early hours of Sunday mornings, which they called Joe’s Apartment. They had taken film inside an apartment, walking in every direction, and then cut the film into short discrete pieces.   The film showed only the apartment, nothing more.  The discrete pieces were then assembled at run-time, in an order determined by a TV viewer using only their landline or mobile phone.  A viewer could phone in and using the phone keypad, control the movement of the camera (left, right, forward, etc). This control of the camera was only apparent. In reality, the viewer was controlling the selection of which discrete piece of film would be seen next.  Any one viewer only retained control of the camera for a few minutes.

Despite the simplicity of the set-up and the lateness of the hour, and much to NYNEX’s surprise, the program attracted thousands of viewers, all seeking to wrest control of the camera.  No doubt a large number of viewers were people who’d spent the evening in close proximity with alcohol.

 

 

 

Who done it?

March 2, 2014 Leave a comment

Insp-Clouseau

The Agents and Intelligent Systems Group in the Department of Informatics was pleased to host last week a research seminar by Clement Guitton, a PhD student in the War Studies Department of King’s College London.

Clement’s PhD is a study of the issue of attribution in cyber attacks.     He explained that conventional wisdom is that attributing an attack is a problem that is primarily technical, that it is impossible, and that each case is unique.  By looking in detail at recent attacks, he has been able to demonstrate that each of these conventional views is mistaken:  Attribution is primarily a political problem, not a technical one; it is often not impossible and is sometimes very easy; and many cases  are similar to one another.    This was a very interesting seminar which led to an interesting discussion of what advice one would give to a young cyber-attacker eager not to be identified!

 

 

 

Copenhagen cast

February 26, 2014 1 comment

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Photos of the cast of Copenhagen.   From top to bottom:  Ria Abbott (Margrethe Bohr), Thomas Marsh (Werner Heisenberg) and Fred Fullerton (Niels Bohr).

 

 

 

Categories: Uncategorized

King’s College hosts Semantic Web Event

February 26, 2014 Leave a comment

This is a guest post by Dr Jarred McGinnis, Visiting Research Fellow in the Agents and Intelligent Systems Group of the Department of Informatics at KCL.

It could be my nationality.  I’m American and we’re a chatty lot.  Or, my career. I started out as an academic, a logician and theoretician. Then I moved toward more applied and managerial roles in industry. I’ve spoken to a lot of people with differing perspectives. I’ve come to appreciate the need for dialogue and understanding.

Besides my role as a Visiting Research Fellow here at King’s, lately I’ve been working with Ontotext who provides semantic repositories and semantic NLP solutions. They’re interesting to work with because they are building technologies, often seen as academic and esoteric, to be used in an enterprise setting within governments, organisations and businesses. Often, I am sitting between the technologists and the business owners translating the needs and desires of one party in the terms of the other as they try to decide whether semantics is something their organisation needs.

It was in the spirit of fostering that cross-discipline communication that I put together the Semantic Web Meet Up hosted in King’s incredible Anatomy Lecture Theatre. The title of the discussion was ‘What Linked Data Does, What Linked Data Need’. I wanted students, academics, technologists and business people to be in the same room talking about the same thing. The plan was to gather a number of professionals currently using semantics and discuss what further work is needed to bring this emerging technology to the mainstream. It would have been hard to have a better panel to cover the spectrum of linked data users. We had:

- Fabio Colasanti, Data and Information Architect at EuroMoney, a publisher of highly valuable economics and financial information.
– Tom Heath, Head of Research at ODI, a nonprofit (and technology neutral) organisation encouraging the opening of data, Linked or otherwise.
– Sofia Angeletou, Senior Data Architect at BBC, the publically funded broadcaster we know and love that has spearheaded the use of Linked Data.
– Pravin Paratey, CTO at Affectv a company that uses NLP and data-driven means to provided targeted and relevant ads to internet users.

We had an incredible turnout and the audience was fantastic. They were full of insightful questions and the discussion continued at the pub afterwards.  I suspect this will be the first of many of these events here at King’s.

Copenhagen

February 25, 2014 1 comment

CopenhagenPosterFB

‘I’m your enemy; I’m also your friend. I’m a danger to mankind; I’m also your guest. I’m a particle; I’m also a wave.’

In the first production from the School of Natural and Mathematical Sciences at King’s College London, memory, guilt and nuclear physics are thrown together in an explosive play about the uncertain nature of the universe – and of our own minds.

1924:   Two physicists, Niels Bohr and his soon-to-be protégé Wernher Heisenberg, come together at a conference. They go on to lay the groundwork for a second Enlightenment, the foundation of modern physics.

1941:  With Copenhagen under German occupation, Heisenberg – now chief scientist on the Nazi atomic research programme – visits his old friend Bohr, and Bohr’s wife Margrethe.  What was said remains unknown, but the conversation ended the closest friendship in physics and nobody, not even those who were present, has ever been able to answer the question: Why did Heisenberg come to Copenhagen?

In an afterlife where the three characters can move freely through their pasts, Michael Frayn’s play delves into that question, and in doing so explores collaboration and complicity, self-knowledge and self-deception, and how we distort our own motives and memories.

Who is to blame for the atomic bomb – for bringing a beleaguered world to the precipice of annihilation?

What is right in times of war, when your life, the lives of your loved ones, hang in the balance?

How can ever know with certainty why we do what we do?

In a compelling and intense production, the play will be performed on Friday 14 March, Saturday 15 March, and Sunday 16 March, each evening at 19.30pm.   The performance venue will be the Old Anatomy Museum, King’s Building, on the Strand Campus of King’s College London.   A map and details of how to reach King’s are here.

For entry to the building, you will need to purchase tickets in advance.   Tickets can be purchased from Eventbrite, here.  Prices are:

  • General Admission: £8
  • Concessions: £5

The Facebook event page is here.  Photos of the cast are here.

Copenhagen is a play by Michael Frayn.  The production is performed by Ria Abbott, Fred Fullerton, and Thomas Marsh.  This production is led by Alister MacQuarrie (Director), Aja Garrod (Producer), and William Nash (Managing Producer).    Financial support has been gratefully received from the King’s College London Alumni & Supporter Relations Office, through the Student Opportunity Fund, funded by the generosity of Alumni donations.   Financial and administrative support from the School of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, the Department of Informatics and the Department of Physics are also gratefully acknowledged.    Administrative and technical support has also been given by King’s Cultural Institute.  The crew and cast also acknowledge the assistance of Samuel French Ltd, in obtaining performance rights for the play.

Categories: Events

Teach me X: iOS Development

February 10, 2014 Leave a comment

The KCL Tech Society is running another in its very popular series of student-led learning sessions tonight, Teach Me X.   This session will be led by James Bellamy and is on mobile app development using iOS.   The session is at 6-7 pm tonight, Monday 19 February, in room K3.11 at the Strand campus of KCL.   Details from the Facebook page.

The Department of Informatics at King’s College London is proud to support this event through the provision of free pizza – since whoever heard of anyone coding without access to pizza!

Atomic Nordic Noir

February 4, 2014 Leave a comment

Copenhagen-canal

Intense rehearsals are underway for performances of Michael Frayn’s celebrated play, Copenhagen, by students at King’s College London.   The play concerns a famous meeting between atomic physicists Werner Heisenberg and Niels Bohr in Copenhagen during World War II, and deals with topics such as quantum physics, the nature of memory, and the responsibility of nuclear scientists for the atom bomb.   This production is an initiative of three King’s students, William Nash (Producer), Alister MacQuarrie (Director) and Aja Garrod-Prance (Producer).  They held open auditions last November for the parts and after auditions and call-backs selected three students for the play:  Ria Abbott, Fred Fullerton and Thomas Marsh.  Rehearsals began when term resumed last month.

The performances of the play will be on the evenings of Friday 14, Saturday 15, and Sunday 16 March 2014, in the Old Anatomy Museum of King’s Building at King’s College London, on Strand.   A panel discussion about the historic and scientific issues raised by the play will be held around the same time as these performances, with speakers from the Physics Department and the Department of War Studies.     Members of the public are very welcome to attend the performances and the panel discussion.

This production is proudly supported by the School of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, and the Departments of Physics and Informatics at King’s College London.

In the meantime, if you would like to see some very professional theatre from the talented people at King’s, hot-foot it to the Greenwood Theatre on Guys’ Campus of King’s this week, where William Nash is directing a production of Romeo and Juliet.   (Wednesday 5, Thursday 6, and Friday 7 February 2014, at 7.45 pm).   People who have managed to sneak past the tight security into rehearsals tell me that the production is funny, exciting, and very definitely noir.

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